1. Sheila, AccessArt
    June 5, 2015 @ 2:14 pm

    A remote controlled ladybird of course!


  2. ellie somerset
    June 19, 2015 @ 11:51 am

    It seems to me that in my recent experience of schools in the north, teachers who have been strong arts co-ordinators in primary schools have been removed from the task to work on raising standards elsewhere – instead the schools now have teams – and the staff seem to be massively under-nourished in their expertise and understanding of how to deliver art. Also I have found that even if you offer potential collaborations free of charge (via funding) they turn you down ( including the opportunity to work with two of us together- a world renowned storyteller and myself – a specialist art teacher! There seems to be a real loss of sight through having to jump through the hoops – from the heads down. This attitude permeates all of our children’s education – and from talking yesterday with an engineer – into the world of engineering too – low level training etc. What is to become of our children’s hands and brains in all of this? These hands are the future’s makers, designers, artists, scientists, teachers and engineers!


    • Paula Briggs, AccessArt
      June 20, 2015 @ 7:47 am

      Thanks Ellie, Yes i think we are beginning to see what we have feared for a while – that as art has gradually got squeezed new generations don’t even now know what they are misisng – and this applies to some (but by no way all) new teachers too – if they never were given the opportunity to experience the value of art ed in their own education, they are less likely to value it in their teaching. And we agree re the volunteering and not being picked up – terrible that we should have to volunteer (though very kind!) and even more terrible when its not perceived as being valued…. BUT there will be a backlash – one day – I hope…


    • Mark hall
      January 31, 2016 @ 10:59 pm

      Ellie Somerset we would love to work with you!!!!!


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