24 Comments

  1. giorgio
    March 17, 2015 @ 12:45 pm

    Hi Paula
    Great work, sharp and clear !!!
    Cheers
    Giorgio

    Reply

  2. Susan Coles
    March 17, 2015 @ 12:48 pm

    A powerful and beautifully written blog on the values of art craft and design education. We must spread this far and wide, so that people start to ask those very important questions. Brilliant. Thank you. #moreartnotless

    Reply

    • Sheila, AccessArt
      March 17, 2015 @ 5:10 pm

      It has to be said Susan – that it is the wonderful work of you and NSEAD over the past years (and other organisations) has made an enormous contribution to raising awareness and giving artists, teachers and educators a voice. Also you have produced facts and figures which help hugely in validating the instinct that not only is art ‘intrinsically good’ but also a valid career path and that the combined activity of ‘creatives’ is of enormous significance to the economy.
      You also bring people together so that together we can shout louder. Thank you for everything you do!

      Reply

  3. Pat Carney
    March 17, 2015 @ 3:57 pm

    As a retired Child Clinical Psychologist may I just add my “hooray, hurrah” to this research. Sadly sometimes the well being of the child is not argument enough to encourage creativity and enablement and for those who require success measured in monetary terms, here it is!

    Reply

  4. Chloe Williams
    March 18, 2015 @ 11:14 am

    Perfect timing…Thankyou! I am just preparing a presentation for a meeting with a group of local head teachers with a view to persuading them that arts education is crucial for child development and well-being and that teaching children to be creative and innovative is important for all areas of industry and business as well as providing crucial life skills. (You can see my prezi here http://prezi.com/ngwit6ffiel1/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share. The slide titled ‘Creativity’ lists more points on the value of arts education)

    Reply

  5. Peter Tinkler
    March 18, 2015 @ 4:30 pm

    This article is well written and well researched, and it’s comforting to know so many people value creativity. Education cannot function without the imagination. It was Einstein who said “imagination is more important than knowledge”, and this is something that must be nurtured and encouraged. We are born creative beings, but somewhere along the conveyor belt of the education system this can be driven out and discriminated against. It is something to protect, as all art is freeing, and therefore essential.

    Reply

  6. Natalie Coyne
    March 18, 2015 @ 8:49 pm

    Great read.
    Working as an art teacher in East Durham, I have been subject to derogatory conversations about my profession that include phrases such as, “colouring in”, “playing with clay” and “a toddler could do that”. Frighteningly these comments weren’t made by parents or students but my pedagogical buddies. When will creativity be seen by the masses as a career not as a ‘hobbie’?

    Reply

  7. Har hari
    March 19, 2015 @ 8:46 am

    I’m heartened to read this research and the contributions here too. Yes!! Of course imagination is crucial and bringing new things Into the world relies on taking the time, having the professionals to hold the space and guide this process. Let’s keep building structures in our schools in our lives for this.

    Reply

  8. vicki miller
    March 19, 2015 @ 8:59 am

    I agree that creativity is central to the education of the next generation in order to keep creative industries flourishing, however I believe that creative education has many other benefits related to all, not just these industries, including improved constructive thinking and increased positive mental health.

    Reply

  9. Vanessa Rolf
    March 19, 2015 @ 1:26 pm

    Your brilliant work supports the value of a creative education which we know is vital to development in so many ways. Please do also check out the Crafts Council’s recent manifesto ‘The Future is in the Making’
    http://www.craftscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/education-manifesto/

    Reply

  10. andrea butler
    March 20, 2015 @ 8:35 am

    An impressive piece of work that presents the information with great clarity – it’s thought-provoking, informative and inspiring! I really value being a part of AccessArt and being able to contribute to and support the work of such a wonderful and visionary organization.

    Reply

    • Paula Briggs, AccessArt
      March 20, 2015 @ 9:02 am

      Thank you Andrea, and we’re very luck to have you work with us!

      Reply

  11. Paula Briggs, AccessArt
    March 20, 2015 @ 9:06 am

    Thank you to you all for your comments – we appreciate all your help in sharing! Today (Friday) – pls do ask “What did my child make with their hands at school this week?”! and if they didn’t – then pls show them this post!

    Many thanks!

    Reply

  12. Susan Coles
    March 20, 2015 @ 10:26 am

    Could be an interesting question to ask adults too- what have you done at work this week that was creative?

    Reply

    • Paula Briggs, AccessArt
      March 20, 2015 @ 10:36 am

      Good point Sue – even as a “maker” when i don’t make for whatever reason i quickly forget the huge satisfaction of manipulating materials by hand…

      Reply

      • Jenny Soep
        March 21, 2015 @ 5:06 pm

        This is so great to read – blog and comments! I must agree with you Susan and Paula – as an adult I think it is really fun and therapeutic to engage in art activities without the pressure of expectations. I think adults need to be encouraged as much as their children, and then I think it will strengthen the support for art. Got your book Paula! Looking forward to testing it out on some guinea pigs and getting back to you! It’s a beautiful thing!

        Reply

        • Paula Briggs, AccessArt
          March 21, 2015 @ 5:13 pm

          Glad you like it Jenny – would love to hear how it goes down in Sweden! xp

          Reply

  13. Miranda
    March 21, 2015 @ 8:21 pm

    Wow! It’s so amazing reading the report, and really backs up the instinctive thoughts about art education that educators, practitioners from all creatively linked fields, and artists have. It does give us a voice and rightly so. Speaking from my own situation as a teaching assistant in a small primary school, which does have some quality creative staff who would embrace more creative opportunities but feel there is just not always time, space or support given the other demands of the modern curriculum. That is one reason why I chose to run an after school art club. I think if the directive came from the top that’s the where the shift will happen. Unfortunately, if ofsted were looking for creative development then that would drive everyone to start shifting their approach. This seems to be the way things are in schools at the moment, so reports like this are invaluable, as are the resources organisations like AccessArt make available.

    Reply

    • Paula Briggs, AccessArt
      March 21, 2015 @ 8:35 pm

      Thank you Miranda for your thoughtful comments. Sheila and I went to the recent All Party Parliamentary Group for Art, Craft and Design Education at the House of Commons: NSEAD and all those present are trying to lobby to get action at the level you describe… We just needs a responsive/receptive ear on which to land! But there was a conversation there about how the pressure also (at the same time) needs to be applied from the bottom up, hence the “What did my child make with their hands at school this week” question. If we can get parents DEMANDING an art education, maybe Oftsed would listen too… as Sheila and I often say to ourselves in AccessArt: “Everything, Everything, Everything” (our mantra!). Thanks for the great work you do Miranda – so close to my heart (- and geographically too!) xpaula

      Reply

  14. Miranda
    March 21, 2015 @ 9:07 pm

    Great food for thought Paula…I’ll endeavour to work on it!

    Reply

  15. Sheila, AccessArt
    March 25, 2015 @ 1:38 pm

    Reply

  16. Marghanita Hughes
    March 28, 2015 @ 10:37 pm

    Nature and Creativity are part of what make us Human. I believe we are all highly creative, spiritual beings and that every child needs access to opportunities to express themselves creatively. Sadly today, there is a great lack of opportunities available for children to be creative and one of the reasons why I run nature based art classes for both children and educators wishing to learn how to actively engage children with nature through meaningful and soulful art projects, planting seeds that lead to a life long journey of love and compassion.
    “Creativity is as important as Literacy” – Sir Ken Robinson

    You can find out more by visiting: http://www.educatingheartnatureart.com or http://www.marghanita.com

    Reply

  17. Paula Briggs, AccessArt
    April 1, 2015 @ 10:05 am

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