Teachers Explore ‘Line and Shape’ at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge with AccessArt

In the spring and summer of 2016, Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge to create and deliver a series of InSET sessions (in-service-training) for primary school teachers.

The aim was to fuse top Museum Education practice with practical, hands on learning in Fine Art disciplines including: drawing, printmaking, sketchbooks, collage and sculpture.

"Fabulous, very interactive, informative and inspirational - thank you!"

"I will use online collections and ideas for how to respond to artist’s work..."

"It has changed the way that I think about the potential of teaching at a lower age in museums by looking in detail at part of a painting and honing in on mark making."

The sessions were carefully recorded to share in the blog posts below.

Thoughtful Drawing and Mark Making in the Armoury at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

This post shares how Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, enabled teachers to explore armour through discussion, drawing and mark making. This post shares how Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, enabled teachers to explore armour through discussion, drawing and mark making.

Using Sketchbooks, Drawing and Reflective Tools in the 20th Century Gallery at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

This post shares how Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, enabled teachers to explore 20th Century paintings and sculpture, through using sketchbooks This post shares how Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, enabled teachers to explore 20th Century paintings and sculpture, through using sketchbooks & drawing as tools for looking and remembering.

Making Sketchbooks at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

This post shares how Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, enabled teachers to make sketchbooks and explore them as a physical space to connect and collect ideas and observations from museum collections. This post shares how Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, enabled teachers to make sketchbooks and explore them as a physical space to connect and collect ideas and observations from museum collections.

Using Drawing to Get Closer to 18th Century Portraits at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

This post shares how Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, used drawing exercises to take a closer look at 18th Century portraits. This post shares how Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, used drawing exercises to take a closer look at 18th Century portraits.

Making Sculptural Interpretations of 18th Century Portraits at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

This post shares how Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, enabled teachers to explore making three dimensional interpretations of two dimensional 18th Century portraits. This post shares how Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, enabled teachers to explore making three dimensional interpretations of two dimensional 18th Century portraits.

Gathering Marks and Tearing Paper to Appreciate Prints by Goya, Turner and Cornelius at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

This post shares how Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, enabled teachers to enter into the intricacies of prints made by Turner, Goya and Cornelius in a Temporary Exhibition at the Fitzwilliam Museum in summer 2016: 1816: Prints by Turner, Goya and Cornelius. This post shares how Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, enabled teachers to enter into the intricacies of prints made by Turner, Goya and Cornelius in a Temporary Exhibition at the Fitzwilliam Museum in summer 2016: 1816: Prints by Turner, Goya and Cornelius.

Monoprinting Inspired by Goya, Turner and Cornelius in the Education Room at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

This post follows on from Gathering Marks and Tearing Paper to Appreciate Prints by Goya, Turner and Cornelius at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge and shares how teachers enjoyed monoprinting on a big scale. The session was facilitated by Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. This post follows on from Gathering Marks and Tearing Paper to Appreciate Prints by Goya, Turner and Cornelius at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge and shares how teachers enjoyed monoprinting on a big scale. The session was facilitated by Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

Teachers Play with Plasticine to Make Prints in the Education Room at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

This post follows on from Gathering Marks and Tearing Paper to Appreciate Prints by Goya, Turner and Cornelius at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge and Monoprinting Inspired by Goya, Turner and Cornelius in the Education Room, and shows how teachers used Plasticine to print textures. The session was facilitated by Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. This post follows on from Gathering Marks and Tearing Paper to Appreciate Prints by Goya, Turner and Cornelius at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge and Monoprinting Inspired by Goya, Turner and Cornelius in the Education Room, and shows how teachers used Plasticine to print textures. The session was facilitated by Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.