Gathering Marks and Tearing Paper to Appreciate Prints by Goya, Turner and Cornelius at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

This post shares how Paula Briggs and Sheila Ceccarelli from AccessArt and Kate Noble from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, enabled teachers to enter into the intricacies of prints made by Turner, Goya and Cornelius in a Temporary Exhibition at the Fitzwilliam Museum in summer 2016:  1816: Prints by Turner, Goya and Cornelius.

Browsing the Print Collection
Browsing the Print Collection

 


Introduction by Kate Noble

Careful Study of a Single Print
Careful Study of a Single Print

 

The Fitzwilliam has a large collection of prints in the collection which are displayed in Temporary Exhibitions.

We spent some time in the temporary exhibition 1816: Prints by Turner, Goya and Cornelius. The prints we looked at were on a smaller scale and contained a lot of detail and so we looked very closely at the different marks the artists had made, focusing on areas of light and dark.


Exercise One: Making a Study Sheet of Marks, Rhythms and Lines 

Teachers were asked to carefully inspect the prints and zoom in to examine the marks in front of them in close detail. They were asked to find small patches of marks and, with a pencil imitate, or replicate, the marks on the paper.

Exploring Mark Making from within the Print
Exploring Mark Making from within the Print

 

Mark Making Study Sheet
Mark Making Study Sheet

 

Mark Making Study Sheet
Mark Making Study Sheet

 


Excerise Two: Looking, Tearing and Placing to Explore Composition

Teachers were encouraged to look at the prints in front of them and look for masses or shapes within the composition. Then, tearing paper, in a physical and intuitive way, to replicate these shapes and place them on a clean sheet.

Collaging Gestural Shapes
Collaging Gestural Shapes

 

Collaging Gestural Shapes
Collaging Gestural Shapes

 

Collaging Gestural Shapes
Collaging Gestural Shapes

 


Exercise Three: Using Carbon Paper to Draw Over the Collaged Composition

Carbon paper is a fabulous medium for replicating the effect of monoprinting but in a very clean and easy way; perfect for a gallery situation.

Here, teachers used carbon paper to draw over their collaged compositions and make a final response to their chosen prints.

Using Carbon Copy Paper to Add Marks
Using Carbon Copy Paper to Add Marks

 

Using Carbon Copy Paper to Add Marks
Using Carbon Copy Paper to Add Marks

 

Using Carbon Copy Paper to Add Marks
Using Carbon Copy Paper to Add Marks

 

MonoPrint Lines over Sugar Paper
MonoPrint Lines over Sugar Paper

 

Creative Response to x
Creative Response to Cornelius

 

Print by Cornelius
Berry Pomeroy Castle Etching (attributed to Henry Dawe, 1790-1848) and mezzotint (J.M.W Turner, 1775–1851), printed in brown ink, P.9901-R

 

Creative Response to Cornelius 1816
Creative Response Berry Pomeroy Castle

 

Creative Response to Cornelius print 1816
Die Erscheinung am Rabenstein. Faust und Mephistopheles auf schwarzen Pferden daher brausend. (The execution at the Raven Stone. Faust and Mephistopheles racing away on black horses.) Ferdinand Ruscheweyh (1785-1846), after drawings by Peter Cornelius (1783-1867) Bilder zu Goethe’s Faust, plate 10. Drawn 1811, engraved 1814. Engraving with etching P.45-1998.10

 

Goya print 1816
Ligereza y atrevimiento de Juanito Apiñani en la de Madrid (The agility and audacity of Juanito Apiñani in [the ring at] Madrid), plate 20 from Tauromaquia Francisco José de Goya (1746-1828) Etching, drypoint, burin and burnished aquatint P.64-1937
Creative Response to x
Creative Response to Goya

 

The Source of the Arveron by Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775–1851
The Source of the Arveyron in the Valley of Chamonix, Savoy Etching (attributed to Henry Dawe, 1790-1848) and mezzotint (J.M.W Turner, 1775–1851), printed in brown ink, P.9903-R

 

Creative Response to The Source of the Arveron by Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775–1851
Creative Response to The Source of the Arveron

 

Warm Up Exercise Developed Through MonoPrint back in the Studio
Warm Up Exercise Developed through MonoPrint back in the Studio

 

Many thanks to the teachers who participated in this InSET training session for sharing their process with AccessArt and the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

Photographs by Paula Briggs.

UK Charity AccessArt created this resource in collaboration with the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

AccessArt has over 850 resources to help develop and inspire your creative thinking, practice and teaching.

AccessArt welcomes artists, educators, teachers and parents both in the UK and overseas.

We believe everyone has the right to be creative and by working together and sharing ideas we can enable everyone to reach their creative potential.

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