Talking Points: Hundertwasser the Architect

A collection of imagery and sources designed to explore the work of architect Hundertwasser.

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Hundertwasser the Architect

Use the following images and videos to introduce children to the work of Austrian artist Friedrich Stowasser, better known by his pseudonym Friedensreich Regentag Dunkelbunt Hundertwasser (1928 – 2000).

Hundertwasser was a visual artist and architect and he also worked in the field of environmental protection.

“Hundertwasser stood out as an opponent of “a straight line” and any standardization, expressing this concept in the field of building design. ” Wiki

www.kunsthauswien.com/en/

https://hundertwasser.com/en

Hundertwasser House by Studio Sarah Lou

Hundertwasser House
by Studio Sarah Lou

Hundertwasser's Beer Tower by AlexDROP

Hundertwasser’s Beer Tower by AlexDROP

Hundertwasser Tower in Abensberg

hundertwasser by twicepix

Hundertwasser by twicepix

Usine d'incinération décorée par F. Hundertwasser (Vienne)

Usine d’incinération décorée par F. Hundertwasser (Vienne) by dalbera

Hundertwasser in Altenrhein. This video is not in English – you may wish to watch it silently and use the opportunity to talk as teacher. 

Questions to Ask Children

What words would you use to describe Hundertwasser’s architecture to those who can’t see it?

How does it make you feel?

What would it be like to be inside the buildings?

What kinds of materials does he use? 

How does he use colour in his buildings?

How important is the relationship of detail to big structures?

Can you see any straight lines?

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