Sketchbook Activities

[MM_Access_Decision access=’false’]Once you have been persuaded that keeping a sketchbook will be a rewarding activity, and you have made your sketchbook, it’s time to start thinking about what types of sketchbook activities you might pursue, and how you can use your sketchbook.

Drawing is a fundamental “sketchbook” activity, but we want to make sure that ALL the activities which might take place in a sketchbook, notebook or journal are equally valid in terms of enabling an exploration and externalisation of thought processes. The more ways we can think of to work in a sketchbook, the greater our vocabulary, and the more accessible (in terms of the number of people it appeals to) the sketchbook becomes.

Sketchbooks can be visual or textual – most are a combination of the two.

There are no hard and fast rules to working in a sketchbook – in fact the opposite should be the case. Sketchbooks are for exploration, investigation, externalisation and discovery – and sketchbooks should be places where those processes can be as idiosynchratic as the sketchbook owner.

Sketchbooks should be places in which mistakes can occur, and revelations be made. They might be a place for repetitive practice, or spontaneous leaps. Look at the sketchbooks of others and be inspired, but don’t feel the need to imitate. If you let your thoughts pour out into your books, your own style of working will evolve.

Sketchbooks are places where you can think out loud, albeit in private. HOW you think out loud, is up to you…


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[/MM_Access_Decision] [MM_Member_Decision membershipId=’1|2|3|4′] Once you have been persuaded that keeping a sketchbook will be a rewarding activity, and you have made your sketchbook, it’s time to start thinking about what types of sketchbook activities you might pursue, and how you can use your sketchbook.

Drawing is a fundamental “sketchbook” activity, but we want to make sure that ALL the activities which might take place in a sketchbook, notebook or journal are equally valid in terms of enabling an exploration and externalisation of thought processes. The more ways we can think of to work in a sketchbook, the greater our vocabulary, and the more accessible (in terms of the number of people it appeals to) the sketchbook becomes.

Sketchbooks can be visual or textual – most are a combination of the two.

There are no hard and fast rules to working in a sketchbook – in fact the opposite should be the case. Sketchbooks are for exploration, investigation, externalisation and discovery – and sketchbooks should be places where those processes can be as idiosynchratic as the sketchbook owner.

Sketchbooks should be places in which mistakes can occur, and revelations be made. They might be a place for repetitive practice, or spontaneous leaps. Look at the sketchbooks of others and be inspired, but don’t feel the need to imitate. If you let your thoughts pour out into your books, your own style of working will evolve.

Sketchbooks are places where you can think out loud, albeit in private. HOW you think out loud, is up to you…


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  • Cancel at any time
  • Access to ALL the inspirational AccessArt resources
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  • Receive discount on our distance learning courses
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  • You might think out loud in sketches…
  • In lists…
  • Through collecting and collaging…
  • Through diagrams and plans…
  • Through mixed media…
  • Through referencing…
  • Through recording…
  • Through doodling…
  • Through making things your own…
  • Through reflection…
Sketchbooks for ... making lists

Sketchbooks for … making lists

Sketchbooks for ... collecting and collaging

Sketchbooks for … collecting and collaging

Sketchbooks for ... referencing

Sketchbooks for … referencing

Sketchbooks for ... sketching

Sketchbooks for … sketching

Sketchbooks for ... combining writing with imagery (Carrie Holder)

Sketchbooks for … combining writing with imagery (Carrie Holder)

Sketchbooks for ... diagrams

Sketchbooks for … diagrams

Sketchbooks for ... making something your own

Sketchbooks for … making something your own

Sketchbooks for ... reflecting

Sketchbooks for … reflecting

Sketchbooks for ... doodling

Sketchbooks for … doodling

Sketchbooks for ... making text visual

Sketchbooks for … making text visual

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3 Comments

  1. How to Introduce and Develop Sketchbooks in Your School | AccessArt: Visual Arts Teaching, Learning & Practice
    Nov 09, 2011 @ 22:30:41

    […] What Kind of Activities Take Place in a Sketchbook? […]

    Reply

    • Elise
      Jan 21, 2012 @ 16:29:16

      All sorts of stuff! Doodling is most common for my pupils!

      Reply

  2. craft projects | Pearltrees
    Mar 18, 2012 @ 23:07:32

    […] What Kind of Activities Take Place in a Sketchbook? | AccessArt: Visual Arts Teaching, Learning &amp… […]

    Reply

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