7 Comments

  1. jennie hewitt
    November 9, 2013 @ 12:10 pm

    great for twilight hours art club – wish I could have facilitated this with a class of twenty in daylight hours trying to understand light and shade with 9/10 year olds last half term. Puts me in mind of Chagall’s print series on the old testament. Find resources that you create inspiring and thought provoking always. Thank you. Jennie

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  2. Sheila Ceccarelli
    November 12, 2013 @ 2:49 pm

    Yes – I agree with Jennie – stunning!
    My six year old is doing light and dark at school – I will forward the post to them. Good idea!

    You’ve inspired me to draw skulls in candle light this evening.
    Beautiful post Paula.
    Thanks

    Reply

  3. Emma Davies
    November 13, 2013 @ 3:39 pm

    What a fantastic workshop! The children created beautiful drawings.
    Thank you Paula

    Reply

  4. ellie somerset
    February 3, 2014 @ 11:58 am

    Just did this in a far too short Woodcraft folk session (a repeat session has been requested and my suggestion is to make our own charcoal first on the wf allotment in autumn). These are very lively children (6 – 9) who do not do regular art classes with me so have not really done much drawing outside of the usual…
    …you could hear a pin drop as they focused on their drawings!!
    The adults loved it as much as the kids. Next time though I will spend a little longer demonstrating different ideas of how to set the scene. A handful made brilliant still lifes with the toys but some of them sort of lined the toys up. They loved the experience of the materials and the magic of the session. Also recommend to include large pebbles /cobbles and made some great trees from twigs stuck into playdough 😉

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    • Paula Briggs
      February 3, 2014 @ 12:12 pm

      Sounds great Ellie thanks for your comment. If you fancy adding any images we’d love t see them!

      Reply

  5. ellie somerset
    February 3, 2014 @ 12:01 pm

    This is sort of linked to the illustration idea (drawing and stories)…although I think drawing should be allowed to stand by itself – in it’s own right – no justification, but this is just another argument of why drawing is such a crucial part of people’s development and lives..
    http://www.scholastic.com/parents/blogs/scholastic-parents-learning-toolkit/more-picture-how-drawing-develops-young-writers?fb_action_ids=10152648872598228&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_ref=.Uu6Svkei514.like&fb_source=other_multiline&action_object_map=%5B281105175374448%5D&action_type_map=%5B%22og.likes%22%5D&action_ref_map=%5B%22.Uu6Svkei514.like%22%5D

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    • Paula Briggs
      February 3, 2014 @ 12:12 pm

      Interesting link Ellie thank you!

      Reply

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